Physiotherapist

Physiotherapists are health care professionals that help people with injuries, disorders and disabilities restore and maintain the ability to move and function. Physiotherapists understand therapy techniques, exercise strategies, and have in-depth knowledge of human movement and function. They use this knowledge to detect and treat problems in the musculoskeletal and cardiac systems, helping people regain their independence and return to their normal, healthy lives.

Physiotherapists treat all kinds of injuries, disorders and disabilities, including:

  • Acute and chronic pain.
  • Musculoskeletal injuries such as sprains, strains, fractures, torn or damaged ligaments and tendons, arthritis and carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Muscular degeneration, dysfunction or pain due to surgery, joint replacement, disease, disability, nervous system damage or injuries, heart and lung disease, cancer, stroke, muscular dystrophy, Parkinson’s disease, cerebral palsy, etc.

  • Cerebral problems such as concussions, headaches and migraines.
  • Pelvic problems, such as bladder and bowel issues.
  • Lung problems, such as asthma.

Physiotherapists provide services throughout healthcare, including hospitals, home care, clinics, schools, private practice, long-term care facilities, etc. Some of these services include:

  • Diagnosing movement and function-related injuries and disorders.
  • Preventing and treating movement problems due to injuries, disorders and disabilities.
  • Designing and implementing treatment plans
  • Prescribing exercises and assistive devices.
  • Promoting health and preventing injury by providing exercise advice.
  • Increasing public awareness and health through public education and government policy.

In Ontario, “Physiotherapist” is a regulated profession subject to the Rules, Standards and Resources defined by The Ontario College of Physiotherapists. For more information on regulatory colleges, view our What is a Regulatory College page.